best basement subfloor 9

best basement subfloor 9
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Rated 5 out of 5 by Apollo from Great subfloor for new carpeted office in existing garage We put this down as the subfloor for a new office for my wife that we carved out of a large 2-car garage. (We work at home - so just one car, but office space needed.) This stuff worked just as well as I hoped - easy to cut, and very little time to install. One thing - I do wish I'd put a couple more anchor screws down, as there were a couple spots on the finished, carpeted floor where we could hear a soft clunk from the subfloor being pushed down on the concrete. (They say you only need anchors around the outside and one in the middle - I'd say, add a few more until you can dance on the subfloor without any excess movement.) Home Depot shipping was way ahead of schedule too - I ordered online, they said a couple weeks, got it in a couple days. (YMMV.) Date published: 2016-10-23


Response to Fred Zheng by Martin Holladay Fred, The correct way to insulate a concrete slab is with rigid foam. If you don't want to use rigid foam, that means that you want to do it the wrong way. If you intend to finish your basement, and your basement slab lacks sub-slab insulation, you’ll need to install some rigid foam above your slab. Otherwise, the slab will be damp during the summer. (If you aren't sure whether your slab has insulation underneath, you can drill a hole through the concrete to inspect what's under there.) The usual technique is to install 1 or 2 inches of XPS or EPS foam insulation on top of the existing concrete, followed by a layer of plywood that is fastened through the foam to the concrete with TapCon fasteners. (If you are still worried that your slab may sometimes be damp, you might want to install a layer of dimple mat under the foam.) When installing this layer of foam, it's important to make the installation as airtight as possible, to make it impossible for any humid interior air to contact the concrete. Seal the edges of each piece of foam insulation with a high-quality European tape, with caulk, or with canned spray foam. If you don’t want to lose the height required for rigid foam, you could try installing a dimpled subfloor product like Delta-FL. (Note that some similar products, notably DRIcore, have mixed reviews from some builders.) For more information on insulating existing basement slabs, see: Finishing a Basement Floor; Green Basement Renovation; or The Stay-Dry, No-Mold Finished Basement.


Wood panels, such as plywood or oriented strand board, are common subfloor choices. However, because wood is a naturally porous substance that will absorb moisture, when used as a basement subfloor, these materials are often installed on mini-joists known as "sleepers," which allow it to sit above a concrete pad. Some experts also recommend coating the panels with a waterproof sealant for extra protection. Once a wood subfloor is installed and waterproof, you can install carpet, laminate and vinyl floors right on top.


Why DRIcore Subfloor? DRIcore is the first and most important step towards creating a new living space as warm and comfortable as any other space in your home. DRIcore is the one-step engineered subfloor solution that is specifically designed for basements. The raised moisture barrier covers cold, damp concrete to protect, insulate and cushion your finished floors. Concrete continually releases moisture. DRIcore Subfloor panels have been designed with air gap technology to keep basement floors dry, comfortable and cozy throughout the entire year.


Response to Nat Hilton by Martin Holladay Nat, If your basement slab lacks sub-slab insulation, you’ll need to install some rigid foam above your slab -- especially if you decide to install carpeting. Otherwise, the slab or the flooring will be damp during the summer (due to condensation on the cool slab). The usual technique is to install 1 or 2 inches of XPS or EPS foam insulation on top of the existing concrete, followed by a layer of plywood that is fastened through the foam to the concrete with TapCon fasteners. (If you are still worried that your slab may sometimes be damp, you might want to install a layer of dimple mat under the foam.) When installing this layer of foam, it's important to make the installation as airtight as possible, to make it impossible for any humid interior air to contact the concrete. Seal the edges of each piece of foam insulation with a high-quality European tape, with caulk, or with canned spray foam. If you don’t want to lose the height required for rigid foam, you could try installing a dimpled subfloor product like Delta-FL. (Note that some similar products, notably DRIcore, have mixed reviews from some builders. For more information on this topic, see comment #6 from Mike Guertin, below.) For more information on insulating existing basement slabs, see: Finishing a Basement Floor; Green Basement Renovation; or The Stay-Dry, No-Mold Finished Basement.


10. Apr 15, 2014 2:24 PM ET best alternative without using rigid foam on the floor by Fred Zheng I have a 7yr old house at West Chester, PA, with concrete slab in my unfinished walk-out basement. I don't know whether the builder had put rigid foam under the slab. I am in the planning stage of having the basement finished. What is the best alternative to provide a subfloor for either carpet or laminates without using rigid foam? Any thick subfloor may require redo the stairs for meeting the code. Thanks.


best alternative without using rigid foam on the floor by Fred Zheng I have a 7yr old house at West Chester, PA, with concrete slab in my unfinished walk-out basement. I don't know whether the builder had put rigid foam under the slab. I am in the planning stage of having the basement finished. What is the best alternative to provide a subfloor for either carpet or laminates without using rigid foam? Any thick subfloor may require redo the stairs for meeting the code. Thanks.


Step 5 Laying a Subfloor for a Concrete Floor Self-leveling compound is a latex-based product which provides a very smooth subfloor. It is needed only if a concrete floor is in poor condition. Despite the name, some smoothing is needed for the best surface. The floor may be raised by the subfloor and flooring, so you may need to trim the lower edge of a door after laying flooring. Preparing the Surface Thoroughly clean the floor. Do not lay compound over any residual bitumen-based products from a previous covering. Prime a dusty surface. Attach a threshold strip across the doorway so that compound does not run into the next room. Mixing the Compound Use a spotlessly clean bucket, because any impurities will affect the mix's integrity, and use a power stirrer to mix slowly, to avoid introducing too much air. Self-leveling compound sets relatively quickly, and will remain workable for no more than 30 minutes. Follow the steps shown for one bucket-load, and immediately mix and lay the next bucket while the wet edge is still workable. The coverage from a bag of compound depends on how thickly it is laid.


Laying a Subfloor for a Concrete Floor Self-leveling compound is a latex-based product which provides a very smooth subfloor. It is needed only if a concrete floor is in poor condition. Despite the name, some smoothing is needed for the best surface. The floor may be raised by the subfloor and flooring, so you may need to trim the lower edge of a door after laying flooring. Preparing the Surface Thoroughly clean the floor. Do not lay compound over any residual bitumen-based products from a previous covering. Prime a dusty surface. Attach a threshold strip across the doorway so that compound does not run into the next room. Mixing the Compound Use a spotlessly clean bucket, because any impurities will affect the mix's integrity, and use a power stirrer to mix slowly, to avoid introducing too much air. Self-leveling compound sets relatively quickly, and will remain workable for no more than 30 minutes. Follow the steps shown for one bucket-load, and immediately mix and lay the next bucket while the wet edge is still workable. The coverage from a bag of compound depends on how thickly it is laid.


I have a 7yr old house at West Chester, PA, with concrete slab in my unfinished walk-out basement. I don't know whether the builder had put rigid foam under the slab. I am in the planning stage of having the basement finished. What is the best alternative to provide a subfloor for either carpet or laminates without using rigid foam? Any thick subfloor may require redo the stairs for meeting the code. Thanks.


Finished Flooring Options DRIcore Subfloor panels are strong enough to stand up to heavy home furnishings, like home gym equipment, pianos, pool tables, etc. Add your favorite finished floor – think enginereed hardwood, laminate, carpet, vinyl or ceramic tile. Another option is to leave the DRIcore as is. Thousands of homeowners have chosen to simply apply a few coats of polyurethane to create a great storage area or place for the kids to play! With a DRIcore Subfloor you can have a strong, clean and stable subfloor that you can count on.

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