Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

Faucet Navigation Water Calculator Water Conservation Tips Indoor Water UseToilets Clothes Washer Showers Faucet Dish Washer Leaks DIY – Installation How to Read Your Water Meter Landscape & Irrigation Water & Energy About Us Blog Kitchen and Bathroom Faucets are Among the Easiest Places to Save Water There are two basic rules to follow: Shut off faucets whenever possible; and Make sure your faucets don’t drip or leak. Faucet water use accounts for 15-18% of the overall water consumption inside the typical household of four persons.  An average American household of 3 uses between 18.1 and 26.7 gallons (68.5 and 101.1 L) per day for all faucets (bathroom, kitchen, and utility sink).  This amounts to between 6,600 and 9,750 gallons (25 and 36.9 m3) per household per year for faucet use.  The main difference between a house that uses 9,750 gallons (36.9 m3) and 6,600 (25 m3) gallons per year is the flow rate of installed faucet aerators.  Reduce the faucet flow rate; save water. Reduce Flows, Save Water and Energy The aerator (the screw-on tip of the faucet nozzle) restricts the maximum flow rate of water from the faucet. New kitchen faucets are usually equipped with a 2.2 gpm (8.3 Lpm) aerator.  Bathroom faucets can have aerators that restrict flow to 1.5, 1.2, 1.0, or 0.5 gallons per minute (5.7, 4.5, 3.8 or 1.9 Lpm).  Basic bathroom faucet aerators start at about $1 each and prices go up depending on the features you select.  Because hot water is frequently drawn from faucets, reducing flows also reduces hot water use which means energy savings. WaterSense Labeled Aerators One of the best ways to reduce water use in the bathroom is to install faucet aerators that have earned the WaterSense label, thus ensuring their water efficiency and performance. WaterSense labeled bathroom sink faucets and accessoriesthat use a maximum of 1.5 gallons per minute can reduce a sink’s water flow by 30 percent or more from the standard flow of 2.2 gallons per minute without sacrificing performance. Low Flow Bathroom Aerators = Water and Energy Savings A basic bathroom faucet aerator is inexpensive and one of the most cost-effective water efficiency measures. It is always a good idea to bring your old aerator (and any associated washers) to the store with you when you purchase a new one to ensure that the new aerator will fit on your faucet fixture. The water, wastewater, and energy saving benefits you get from installing new faucet aerators is primarily determined by your current aerators. But since faucet aerators are cheap and the water savings are well documented, it’s a safe bet that you will pay for your aerator investment in less than two years. How to Fix a Leaky Faucet Take Care in the Kitchen Reducing the faucet flow rate in the kitchen below 2.2 gpm (8.3 Lpm) is easily accomplished by replacing the aerator, but the water savings may be somewhat limited.  Many faucet uses in the kitchen are not discretionary.  For example, filling a pot with water to make pasta.  Regardless of the faucet flow rate, the volume of water needed to fill the pot is the same.  Reducing the flow rate of the kitchen faucet saves water and energy, but also results in longer wait times to fill fixed volumes and can also reduce effectiveness for hand-washing to dishes. Consider the Utility Sink If your home has a utility sink in the laundry room or garage, you may have an excellent opportunity for easy water and energy savings by simply replacing the aerator.  Like the kitchen sink, it’s important to consider the frequent uses of water in the sink when selecting an aerator.  If you use the utility sink frequently to fill up buckets or tubs with water, it may make sense to use a higher flow aerator.  If the utility sink is mostly used for hand washing or cleaning, a lower flow rate will probably be just fine.  The lower the faucet flow rate the greater the water and energy savings.
kitchen faucet flow rate 1

Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

Kitchen and Bathroom Faucets are Among the Easiest Places to Save Water There are two basic rules to follow: Shut off faucets whenever possible; and Make sure your faucets don’t drip or leak. Faucet water use accounts for 15-18% of the overall water consumption inside the typical household of four persons.  An average American household of 3 uses between 18.1 and 26.7 gallons (68.5 and 101.1 L) per day for all faucets (bathroom, kitchen, and utility sink).  This amounts to between 6,600 and 9,750 gallons (25 and 36.9 m3) per household per year for faucet use.  The main difference between a house that uses 9,750 gallons (36.9 m3) and 6,600 (25 m3) gallons per year is the flow rate of installed faucet aerators.  Reduce the faucet flow rate; save water. Reduce Flows, Save Water and Energy The aerator (the screw-on tip of the faucet nozzle) restricts the maximum flow rate of water from the faucet. New kitchen faucets are usually equipped with a 2.2 gpm (8.3 Lpm) aerator.  Bathroom faucets can have aerators that restrict flow to 1.5, 1.2, 1.0, or 0.5 gallons per minute (5.7, 4.5, 3.8 or 1.9 Lpm).  Basic bathroom faucet aerators start at about $1 each and prices go up depending on the features you select.  Because hot water is frequently drawn from faucets, reducing flows also reduces hot water use which means energy savings. WaterSense Labeled Aerators One of the best ways to reduce water use in the bathroom is to install faucet aerators that have earned the WaterSense label, thus ensuring their water efficiency and performance. WaterSense labeled bathroom sink faucets and accessoriesthat use a maximum of 1.5 gallons per minute can reduce a sink’s water flow by 30 percent or more from the standard flow of 2.2 gallons per minute without sacrificing performance. Low Flow Bathroom Aerators = Water and Energy Savings A basic bathroom faucet aerator is inexpensive and one of the most cost-effective water efficiency measures. It is always a good idea to bring your old aerator (and any associated washers) to the store with you when you purchase a new one to ensure that the new aerator will fit on your faucet fixture. The water, wastewater, and energy saving benefits you get from installing new faucet aerators is primarily determined by your current aerators. But since faucet aerators are cheap and the water savings are well documented, it’s a safe bet that you will pay for your aerator investment in less than two years. How to Fix a Leaky Faucet Take Care in the Kitchen Reducing the faucet flow rate in the kitchen below 2.2 gpm (8.3 Lpm) is easily accomplished by replacing the aerator, but the water savings may be somewhat limited.  Many faucet uses in the kitchen are not discretionary.  For example, filling a pot with water to make pasta.  Regardless of the faucet flow rate, the volume of water needed to fill the pot is the same.  Reducing the flow rate of the kitchen faucet saves water and energy, but also results in longer wait times to fill fixed volumes and can also reduce effectiveness for hand-washing to dishes. Consider the Utility Sink If your home has a utility sink in the laundry room or garage, you may have an excellent opportunity for easy water and energy savings by simply replacing the aerator.  Like the kitchen sink, it’s important to consider the frequent uses of water in the sink when selecting an aerator.  If you use the utility sink frequently to fill up buckets or tubs with water, it may make sense to use a higher flow aerator.  If the utility sink is mostly used for hand washing or cleaning, a lower flow rate will probably be just fine.  The lower the faucet flow rate the greater the water and energy savings.
kitchen faucet flow rate 2

Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

Home News & Insights News & Insights Industry Insights Design Trends Trade Tips Product Styles Trend Videos Case Studies Industry Associations News News Articles Press Releases Legislation Compliance Certifications Product Deletions Green Articles « Back Articles and reference materials from our business to yours. Eco-Performance Kitchen Faucets Moen announces the transition of its entire portfolio of kitchen faucets to Eco-Performance models, bringing both water efficiency and consumer-accepted performance to the kitchen sink. This transition applies to Moen and Cleveland Faucet Group (CFG) kitchen faucets offered at wholesale showrooms and retail outlets throughout the U.S. All Moen pullout and pulldown kitchen and bar/prep faucets now offer a flow rate of 1.5 gallons per minute (gpm), providing a 30 percent water savings from the industry standard 2.2 gpm. All fixed-spout faucets, with or without sidespray, provide a reduced 2.0 gpm flow. What were the driving factors behind the shift to Eco-Performance kitchen faucets? In December of 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy waived the Federal preemption clause in the Energy Policy Act concerning the water efficiency of faucets, showerheads water closets and urinals, opening the door for state and local jurisdictions to tailor water restrictions to their specific needs. In addition, California and Georgia are the first states that have passed legislation limiting the flow of kitchen faucets to 1.8 and 2.0 gpm, respectively. Moen was eager to provide a consumer-accepted solution to meet new state-and county-level legislation restricting water flow for kitchen faucets. The addition of new Eco-Performance kitchen faucets rounds out the Moen Eco-Performance product portfolio, which also includes a complete selection of high-performance, water-saving lavatory faucets, showerheads and handshowers, a major reason Moen was selected as WaterSense Partner of the Year in 2010, and a WaterSense Partner of Excellence in 2011. Why transition all Moen and CFG faucets? Moen’s Eco-Performance kitchen faucets conserve a significant amount of water, allowing homeowners, property owners, and property managers to reduce water consumption and comply with current legislative requirements set forth in California (CalGreen) and Georgia (Water Stewardship Act of 2010, or SB370). These new faucets will also help builders and remodelers achieve valuable LEED certification. New Eco-Performance kitchen faucets also provide the benefit of cost savings, through the reduction of water usage. When did the transition take place? The transition from standard to Eco-Performance kitchen faucets sold through wholesale showrooms began on April 1, 2012 The transition to Eco-Performance kitchen faucet models sold through retail outlets begins on May 1, 2012 All Moen kitchen faucets shipped after July 1, 2012 are Eco-Performance models. What are the new flow rates for Moen’s Eco-Performance kitchen faucets? Pulldown, pullout and bar/prep kitchen faucets offer a flow rate of 1.5 gpm Fixed-spout kitchen faucets, with or without sidespray, provide a flow rate of 2.0 gpm Will I notice a difference in performance in my new kitchen faucet? Moen Eco-Performance kitchen faucets were created to reduce water usage, without a significant difference in performance when completing everyday tasks – like washing dishes, rinsing vegetables or cleaning in and around the sink. Will the new Eco-Performance flow rates limit style options or platforms for Moen kitchen faucets? The transition to Eco-Performance kitchen faucet models will not affect the styling of existing or future Moen faucets. Moen will continue to offer a wide array of kitchen faucet styles, finishes and platforms to meet consumers’ needs. Do the new flow rates meet water efficiency standards set forth by recent legislation in California and Georgia? Water use reduction achieved with Moen Eco-Performance pulldown and pullout kitchen faucets exceeds requirements set forth by CalGreen, California’s Green Building Standards Code. CalGreen requires that all new kitchen faucets installed on or after January 1, 2013 flow at 1.8 gpm. Moen Eco-Performance pulldown and pullout kitchen faucets exceed water-savings standards set forth by Georgia’s Water Stewardship Act of 2010, which specifies the use of 2.0 gpm fixtures by July, 2012. In addition, Moen’s fixed-spout faucets meet the new Water Stewardship Act requirement. Is there currently a national standard regulating the flow rates of kitchen faucets? At this time, there is a national standard regulating flow rates for kitchen faucets to 2.2 gpm. Do Moen Eco-Performance kitchen faucets meet WaterSense® criteria? There is currently no WaterSense specification for kitchen faucets.

Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate
Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate
Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate
Kitchen Faucet Flow Rate

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