Landscape Timber Edging

Landscape Timber Edging

Day Landscape timber edging is a great way to add a raised garden bed to your lawn Landscape timbers are an excellent edging for a raised garden bed. While a single course of 4-by or 6-by timbers simply can be set into the ground, there isn’t a lot more involved in assembling two courses than securing them to each other. This guide will teach you the best way to incorporate landscape timbers into your landscape. WHAT YOU NEED FOR THIS PROJECT Tape measure Spade Circular saw Drill (18v minimum) Hand saw Hammer 3-pound sledgehammer Level Garden rake 3/8 Inch flat bit Square Carpenters pencil Safety goggles Gloves Mason’s line Landscape timbers(6x6s) 10-inch spikes TOOLS Tape measure Spade Circular saw Drill (18v minimum) Hand saw Hammer 3-pound sledgehammer Level Garden rake 3/8 Inch flat bit Square Carpenters pencil Safety goggles Gloves MATERIALS Mason’s line Landscape timbers(6x6s) 10-inch spikes 1 Outline your space & dig the trench Lay out the bed and dig a trench 3 to 4 inches deep for the timbers along the garden border. Make sure the trench is level by checking the depth with a tape measure and a level mason’s line. 2 Insert timbers and level Place the timbers of the first course in the trench and abut the ends together tightly. Use a level to check that the timbers sit level. Add or remove soil as necessary. 3 Trim timbers To trim a timber to length, measure and mark the location with the pencil. Next use the square and pencil to draw a line across the face of the timber, rotating the timber and marking each face till you return to where you started. Cut across each face with the circular saw. 4 Lay the second level of timbers Place the timbers of the second course so that joints are offset at least 4 inches from the ones in the first course. Overlap the ends at the corners. Overlapping the joints adds stability between layers when stacking the timbers. 5 Level the timbers and shim As you layout timbers check that the course of timbers is roughly level. If necessary, shim the low ends with thin strips of wood. At corners, square the timbers with a framing square. 6 Use spikes to connect timbers Drill pilot holes slightly smaller than the diameter of a 10-inch spike at each end and every 4 feet along the second course. Drive a 10-inch spike into each hole with a 3-pound sledgehammer. 7 Add soil Add soil to the bed behind the edging timbers & smooth the bed with a garden rake. If you intend to plant edibles within the timber edging you will need to use a barrier-like pond liner to keep the soil separate from the pressure treated timbers. This liner should be stapled to and run along the entire inside perimeter of the timbers.
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Landscape Timber Edging

Landscape timbers typically limit your edging options to only straight edges if you use whole timbers, but shorter vertical landscape timber pieces allow you to form curves for a more flexible landscape design. While you can cut the pieces to all the same heights, you can create staggered edging if you cut the pieces to different lengths. Choose pressure-treated landscape timbers, if possible, to protect the portion of the timbers that you bury in the ground. This type of edging works well for a tropical landscaping style or if you want to add visual interest to any space.
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Landscape Timber Edging

Planning ahead for this edging project — as is so often the case in DIY projects — will make the work easier. In this case, I am referring specifically to the issue of whether you should install the edging prior to planting in the bed. As I mentioned earlier, while it is certainly possible to install landscape timber edging as an afterthought, you can make your life a bit easier by installing the edging first, then transplanting your plants into the bed. Here is why:
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Landscape Timber Edging

1 Outline your space & dig the trench Lay out the bed and dig a trench 3 to 4 inches deep for the timbers along the garden border. Make sure the trench is level by checking the depth with a tape measure and a level mason’s line. 2 Insert timbers and level Place the timbers of the first course in the trench and abut the ends together tightly. Use a level to check that the timbers sit level. Add or remove soil as necessary. 3 Trim timbers To trim a timber to length, measure and mark the location with the pencil. Next use the square and pencil to draw a line across the face of the timber, rotating the timber and marking each face till you return to where you started. Cut across each face with the circular saw. 4 Lay the second level of timbers Place the timbers of the second course so that joints are offset at least 4 inches from the ones in the first course. Overlap the ends at the corners. Overlapping the joints adds stability between layers when stacking the timbers. 5 Level the timbers and shim As you layout timbers check that the course of timbers is roughly level. If necessary, shim the low ends with thin strips of wood. At corners, square the timbers with a framing square. 6 Use spikes to connect timbers Drill pilot holes slightly smaller than the diameter of a 10-inch spike at each end and every 4 feet along the second course. Drive a 10-inch spike into each hole with a 3-pound sledgehammer. 7 Add soil Add soil to the bed behind the edging timbers & smooth the bed with a garden rake. If you intend to plant edibles within the timber edging you will need to use a barrier-like pond liner to keep the soil separate from the pressure treated timbers. This liner should be stapled to and run along the entire inside perimeter of the timbers.
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Landscape Timber Edging

Now that the edging is secure, there will be gaps around the wood. Fill these gaps with more gravel and pour an even distribution over the perimeter of the enclosed area of the garden. Once done and before clearing the place, just re-check the gaps. Once all are filled properly, clear any excess gravel that may have been poured over the timber edging. With that done, you have successfully installed the landscape edging.
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Landscape Timber Edging

Stand up a 24-inch timber piece tight against the first 30-inch piece, then push an 18-inch timber piece against the 24-inch piece. Continue with this pattern, alternating the 30-inch, 24-inch and 18-inch landscape timber pieces down the entire length of the edging trench.
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6Stand up a 24-inch timber piece tight against the first 30-inch piece, then push an 18-inch timber piece against the 24-inch piece. Continue with this pattern, alternating the 30-inch, 24-inch and 18-inch landscape timber pieces down the entire length of the edging trench.
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The first step to installing landscape timbers it to measure. Before you head to your nearest Home Depot, you have to know how much timber to buy. Using edging stakes and yarn, measure out your flower bed, gardening path, etc. Make sure you hammer the stakes in the ground and tie the yard as tight as possible. Once all set up, measure the length (and width if you want to go wider than one timber).

Tie one end of a ball of string around an edging stake.Drive this edging stake into the ground, using a mallet, at one end of the border planting.Walk towards the other end of the border planting, unwinding the string as you go.When you get to the other end, cut the string and tie it to another edging stake.Drive the latter into the ground.If the string is not taut, wrap it a little tighter around one of the stakes.

Lumber or timber edging can be used with any patio surface material. Here, this lumber edging is not only decorative, it also holds all of the loose material in place.

How to Install Timber Edging 1 Dig Perimeter Trench During the site excavation, dig a perimeter trench for the timbers so they will install flush with the top of the patio or walkway surface (or just above the surface for loose material). 2 Add Compacted Gravel Base Add the compacted gravel base, as required, including a 2″ to 4″ layer in the perimeter trench. 3 Cut Timbers to Length Cut timbers to the desired length using a reciprocating saw with a long wood-cutting blade, a circular saw, or a handsaw. 4 Drill Holes Through Timbers + Cut Rebar Drill 1⁄2″ holes through each timber, close to the ends and every 24″ in between. Cut a length of 1⁄2″-diameter (#4) rebar at 24″ for each hole using a reciprocating saw and metal-cutting blade. 5 Set Timbers + Use Layout String as a Guide Set the timbers in the trench and make sure they lie flat. Use your layout strings as guides for leveling and setting the height of the timbers. 6 Anchor Timbers Anchor the timbers with the rebar, driving the bar flush with the wood surface.
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There are certain landscape timber basics all must know before embarking on such a landscaping project. Like many other home materials, landscape timbers come in a variety of colors and materials. They are similar to wood planks in that many of them come in 4-foot or 8-foot lengths. However, the primary difference is that landscape timbers are flat on the bottom and top. As you can imagine, this makes landscape timbers ideal for building or stacking.

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